The following is to serve as our own archive of today's DrudgeReport.  Information will continue to evolve and if there's one thing we've learned it's to try to grab hold of any and all information before it's scrubbed.  One other thing is for sure:  with all the anti-gun legislation coming up as well as everything else spinning around us, do NOT let this distract you too heavily; watch what the other hand is doing because I can guarantee they will not let this crisis go to waste.  In fact, this could very well be that next "9/11" event we've been anticipating.  The magnitude and ramifications of this cannot be underestimated.

 



 
 
BREAKING NEWS: 
Two explosions occurred near the Boston Marathon finish line at 2:50 p.m. The race was diverted before being halted as police and fire crews swept the area. Another device was found, which was purposely detonated by Boston Police at Boylston Street. Another incident at JFK Library, which was thought to be a fourth-related incident, is now being considered as a fire-related issue by the Boston Police Department.  Two people are dead and 107 are injured. >>> This is a developing story. 

-- Boston Police are looking for tips: 617-635-4500 or 1-800-494-TIPS. 


Explosions kill at least 2 at Boston Marathon; dozens injured


 

BOSTON — Two bombs exploded at the venerable Boston Marathon on Monday, killing two people, sending hundreds of runners scrambling for cover and rattling nerves around the nation, authorities said.

The blasts occurred in rapid succession as thousands of people were still running. Video footage showed an explosion off to the side as runners were nearing the finish line, with some toppling over from the concussion. Smoke rose into the air, and photos of the scene showed a sidewalk slicked with blood.

Video

Video captures the moment of one of the two explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Video captures the moment of one of the two explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

 

The explosions, occurring on the Patriot’s Day holiday that commemorates the Revolutionary War battles of Lexington and Concord, were as shocking in their symbolism as in their force. The Boston Marathon is a highly prestigious race and is as much a symbol of Boston as Fenway Park.

Two federal law enforcement officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, confirmed that the blasts were caused by explosive devices. The repercussions extended from Massachusetts to Washington, where President Obama was briefed by top officials, the White House increased security, and the Justice Department and FBI mobilized to fully investigate what had happened.

In a brief appearance at the White House shortly after 6 p.m., Obama expressed sympathy for the victims of the blasts and said all the necessary resources of the federal government would be assigned to assist Boston officials in determining the cause of the explosions.

“We still do not know who did this or why, and people shouldn’t jump to conclusions before we have all the facts,” Obama said. “But make no mistake — we will get to the bottom of this.”

A White House official called the explosions an “act of terror,” saying authorities have much to learn about who was behind it.

“Any event with multiple explosive devices — as this appears to be — is clearly an act of terror, and will be approached as an act of terror,” the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “However, we don’t yet know who carried out this attack, and a thorough investigation will have to determine whether it was planned and carried out by a terrorist group, foreign or domestic.”

In addition to the two confirmed deaths, police said more than 20 people were injured. Other media reports placed the injury toll as more than 100 people.

Initial reports of another explosion at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston turned out to be an unrelated fire. Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick urged people to “stay out of crowds” as they made their way home.

A CNN producer who was at the race said the first large explosion was followed about 10 seconds later by another blast. He said he saw at least five or six people who appeared to be injured.

Emergency personnel rushed to the area, and the street was quickly sealed off.

“I saw it go off and smoke billowed up. Everyone just stopped and hunched down,” said Pam Ledtke, 51, from Indianapolis, who was about 75 yards from the finish line when the explosions went off. “They didn’t know what to do,” Ledtke said.

“All of a sudden, people were screaming,” Ledtke added.

The explosions occurred shortly before 3 p.m. near the intersection of Boylston and Exeter streets. Local media reports said store fronts were blown out.

Many of the injured appeared to be spectators who were watching the race. About half of the nearly 27,000 participants had reportedly finished the race when the blasts occurred. The racers came from at least 56 countries and territories.

“I saw two explosions,” reported Boston Herald journalist Chris Cassidy, who was running in the marathon. “The first one was beyond the finish line. I heard a loud bang and I saw smoke rising.” The blast “looked like it was in a trash can or something,” he said. “There are at least a dozen that seem to be injured in some way.”

Police established a crime scene around the Prudential Center, which is near the finish line. The blast apparently occurred about 300 yards from the finish line.

Authorities in New York and Washington tightened security precautions in the wake of the blasts. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives sent all of its bomb technicians, explosives officers, explosives specialists and canine officers from their Boston and New York field divisions to the scene, as well as some investigators from Washington.

Shortly after being notified around 3 p.m., Obama received a briefing from homeland security adviser Lisa Monaco and other members of his senior White House staff in the Oval Office. The president called Boston Mayor Tom Menino and Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick to express his concern for those who were injured and to make clear that his administration is ready to provide support.

Witnesses described a chaotic scene in the immediate aftermath of the blasts.

Paul Cummings, a 44-year-old runner from Portland, Oregon, was in the medical tent near the finish line getting a leg massage when the explosions occurred.

“It didn’t sound like a water main blowing or anything else — it sounded like a bomb,” Cummings said. “Maybe I watch too much TV or something, but as soon as I heard it, I knew it was a bomb. It was just a loud explosion, and then another. You can’t hear a noise like that and think anything good happened.”

As police started bringing wounded people into the tent, Cummings quickly got up and left. “I just thought, ‘I’m out of here.’ ”

He stepped out into Copley Square to wailing sirens, people shouting and crying and police imploring the crowds to leave the area.

Jay Hartford, 46, a nurse at Boston Children’s Hospital, was about 800 yards from the finish when he heard the explosions. He thought they were electrical and kept running. Then he saw smoke billowing across Boylston Street. Runners started to panic, he said.

“Some people hit the ground, in shock,” he said. “A woman [runner] was on her knees screaming” in fear, not injury.

Police along the route started pushing barriers across Boylston, to keep runners from approaching the finish line, he said.

“Stop, turn back!” the police shouted to oncoming runners, Hartford said.

Hartford called wife and four boys, whom he had just seen along the route, and told them to go straight home.

Hartford became choked up at the enormity of this calamity befalling one of Boston’s most beloved traditions.

“It was going to be my best marathon, but I feel I’ve got to get to work” at the hospital, Hartford said.

Boston.com sports producer Steve Silva also was near the finish line when the explosions occurred.

“It was just immediately [evident] there were injuries, right in the middle of the spectator crowds,” Silva said. “There was blood everywhere, there were victims being carried out on stretchers. I saw someone lose their leg. People are crying. People are confused.”

Medical workers from a nearby medical tent dashed to help the victims, the eyewitnesses said. Volunteers jumped over tables piled with Gatorade bottles to attend to the wounded.

John Hampson, 19, a photographer for the Tufts University student newspaper, said race officials yelled at the bystanders to flee, saying there was a third bomb that had not exploded.

“There was a huge cloud of smoke, like a giant ball” when the bombs went off, he said.

One explosive seemed to go off in a building and another in a crowd of onlookers about six people deep, he said.

“It was horrifying. I felt it, and I saw the cloud... It was awful. Then people were coming by on stretchers,” he said.

Mary Beth Sheridan and Doug Struck in Boston, and William Branigin, Lyndsey Layton, David Montgomery, Roxanne Roberts, Zachary A. Goldfarb, Philip Rucker, Jule Tate and Amy Gardner contributed to this report.

 

FOX News

At least two people are dead and 73 injured – including up to 10 with amputated limbs – after two bombs tore through the finish line of the Boston Marathon, according to the Boston Police Department.

Authorities were guarding a person of interest at a local hospital, according to a New York Post report confirmed by Fox News. The person, who sources said was 20 years old, had severe burns, but authorities had not determined whether the person was a victim or a perpetrator. Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis said during a press conference that no suspect is in custody. 

The simultaneous explosions just before 3 p.m. and reports of two other unexploded devices found near the scene raised suspicions of a terrorist attack. Intelligence officials told The Associated Press two unexploded devices were being dismantled. Competitors and race organizers were crying as they fled the bloody chaos, while some witnesses reported seeing victims with lost limbs.

"Somebody's leg flew by my head," a spectator, who gave his name as John Ross, told the Boston Herald. “I gave my belt to stop the blood.”

The first two explosions occurred at 2:50 p.m. – nearly five hours after the marathon began – about 50 to 100 yards apart, according to Davis. A third explosion occurred near the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in the Columbia Point section of Dorchester, several miles southeast of the marathon's finish line, at around 4:15 p.m. Police could not say if it was related to the earlier explosions.

The FBI, which was treating the bombing as a terrorist investigation, was analyzing video from several area surveillance cameras. 

Twenty-six people were transported to Brigham and Women's Hospital, including a 3-year-old, who was then taken to a children's hospital. A doctor at the hospital said at least two of the patients there are in critical condition and that some have burns and injuries that will likely require amputations. 

Witnesses heard booms that sounded like two claps of thunder near the finish line inside the Fairmount Copley Plaza Hotel, according to multiple local reports. The horror unfolded as the city marked the 238th annual Patriot's Day, commemorating the anniversary of the Battles of Lexington and Concord at the beginning of the Revolutionary War.

Video of the scene showed a number of emergency crews in the area tending to victims and blood on the ground near the finish line. 

"I saw two explosions. The first one was beyond the finish line. I heard a loud bang and I saw smoke rising," Boston Herald reporter Chris Cassidy, who was running in the marathon, told the newspaper. "I kept running and I heard behind me a loud bang. It looked like it was in a trash can or something...There are people who have been hit with debris, people with bloody foreheads.”

"There are a lot of people down," said one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter of North Carolina. He was not injured, but marathon workers were carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg. A Boston police officer was wheeled from the course with a leg injury that was bleeding.

About three hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another thunderous explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

Runner Laura McLean of Toronto said she heard two explosions outside the medical tent.

"There are people who are really, really bloody," McLean said. "They were pulling them into the medical tent."

Cherie Falgoust was waiting for her husband, who was running the race.  "I was expecting my husband any minute," she said. "I don't know what this building is ... it just blew. Just a big bomb, a loud boom, and then glass everywhere. Something hit my head. I don't know what it was. I just ducked."

Authorities in New York, meanwhile, are deploying counter-terrorism vehicles around landmark sites in Manhattan, including prominent hotels, according to the New York City Police Department.  

Nearly 25,000 people, including runners from around the world, competed in Boston's celebrated 26.2-mile race, attracting huge throngs of onlookers, especially near the finish line.

"This is a horrific day in Boston," Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said in a statement. "My thoughts and prayers are with those who have been injured. I have been in touch with the President, Mayor [Thomas] Menino and our public safety leaders. Our focus is on making sure that the area around Copley Square is safe and secured. I am asking everyone to stay away from Copley Square and let the first responders do their jobs."

Anyone with information on the bombings is being urged to call Boston authorities at 1-800-494-TIPS. 

Click for more from MyFoxBoston.com

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


ABC News


 

 

 

Eyewitnesses at the Boston Marathon described the ground shaking beneath their feet, smoke and "a lot of chaos" this afternoon when explosions killed two people and injured dozens.

Rachel Sibley, 22, was 50 feet from the finish line waiting for a friend to cross.

WATCH: Marathon Witness Rachel Sibley

"All of a sudden I heard this bang that sounded like a cannon," she said. "You could see people looking up at the sky like there were fireworks, like a celebratory bang. The whole crowd waited for a moment, and then the second one went off. It was terrifying and absolute chaos.

READ: Explosions Kill Two, Injure Dozens at Boston Marathon

"Everyone needed to get out of there," said Sibley. "I was ready to just start running, otherwise I'd be tackled. You could see the panic in people's faces.

"People started screaming and yelling at each other, trying to find friends and family members," she said. "People started running away from the finish line. There were sirens filling the streets and heading back to the finish line. It was absolutely terrifying."

WATCH: Boston Police Investigate Explosion at JFK Library

One doctor in a medical tent about 150 yards from the explosion said he was immediately mobilized.

"We all went running over there and started to bring people into the medical tent," he said. "It was not good. Very bad. Like a war zone. 9/11 immediately came to mind."

He said the subways were immediately shut down and people were walking out of the area.

See photos of the chaos at the finish line.

One eyewitness, Joe Conway, said he saw a giant cloud of gray smoke and ran to the food court at the Prudential Center.

"People were running out and didn't know what was going on," he told ABC News. "I had a baseball hat on and could feel the concussion. The baseball hat fell off my head."

Amanda Fahkkredine, 25, had just walked down into the Arlington subway station a few blocks from the finish line when the bombs went off. As two trains were pulling into the station, she heard it.

"You heard this huge noise and a rumble, and then two T transit police started yelling at everyone to get out of the station," Fahkkredine said. "They didn't seem to know what was going on."

Marathoners began hobbling up the subway stairs. Fahkkredine asked transit police what happened, but they told her they didn't know -- that everyone just had to get out.

"We heard it, and we no idea if there was a train crash or car accident," she said. "It wasn't like anything that I've ever heard or felt before. It was like an earthquake sounding like a car crash."

Back above ground, officers told pedestrians to stay away from landmarks.

Fahkkredine finally got word from her boyfriend that it was a bomb. Although Fahkkredine is not a Boston native, she graduated from Boston University in 2010 and calls the city home.

"I can't believe that just happened," she said. "It's shocking."

The first blast was reported at 2:42 p.m. near the finish line medical tent. By 3:15, authorities said a second device was reported at Saint James Avenue and Trinity Place.

The race was stopped about 3:28 p.m. EMS was tagging everyone affected with red wristbands and beginning transports to Boston hospitals.

A controlled explosion occurred at 4 p.m.

"People were running and screaming and crying in the area," college student Dan Lamariello told ABC News. "There was trampling, running It was a very scary scene."

Racer Jill Elaine Czarnik, 24, of Chicago, finished just 20 minutes after the explosion went off. She was standing in the hospitality area about a quarter mile from the finish line.

"I was in the first wave and I think most people [when the explosions went off] were in the second wave," said Czarnik, who didn't hear the explosion. "It's kind of like a movie scene. ... I think everyone is just kind of like in shock. ... I still feel a little shaky, but I feel safe now. ... It's just very weird ... because you don't know what it is and you're just very delusional because you just ran a marathon."

Phone lines were too busy for many people in the area to reach friends and relatives.

"They're saying just send texts and not to make phone calls so people can reach their loved ones," said Czarnik.

Dan Lau of Boston, a 25-year-old engineer running his sixth marathon, said he was three or four blocks away from the chaos, crossing the finish line about 20 minutes earlier.

"It sounded like something from out of a movie," he said.

"Initially, folks were running towards a narrow, fenced-in exit spilling over to Newbury, but several bystanders diffused the panic and calmed us down," he said. "My first impression was either a truck hit a building or a subway train crashed. Then, when the second went off, my friend and I knew it was more serious. My friend immediately thought it was a bomb. To quote him, he said, 'That's definitely not thunder.'"

Runners further back were stopped by authorities. Josh Crary, one of 40 blind or visually impaired runners, had to stop at mile 20 in suburban Newton, west of the city.

"We stopped after my sister gave me a phone call," said Crary, a 27-year-old from Barnstead, N.H. "She said there had been an explosion and people were running away. Ten minutes later, the race was shut down."

His sister was in a VIP booth at the finish line. Crary said he and his guide were taken in by neighbors.

"Some folks took us into their home," he said. "It's almost impossible to call people because cell phones are busy. Hopefully, this is some sort of freak accident or explosion and not some other terrible scenario."

A Google document circulated on which Bostonians listed their contact information and offered up places for marathon runners to stay. As of three hours after the explosions, 708 people had offered up their homes.

As for not being able to finish the race, Crary said, "I could care less about the finish. There are much bigger things to worry about."

ABC News' Lauren Effron, Liz Neporent, Susanna Kim and Kelley Robinson contributed to this report.


NY Post

 

12 dead, at least 50 more injured after terror attack on Boston Marathon, suspect identified and being guarded in hospital

  • Last Updated: 7:13 PM, April 15, 2013
  • Posted: 3:04 PM, April 15, 2013

An unidentified Boston Marathon runner leaves the course crying near Copley Square following an explosion in Boston.

AP

An unidentified Boston Marathon runner leaves the course crying near Copley Square following an explosion in Boston.

BOSTON — Two explosions shattered the euphoria of the Boston Marathon finish line on Monday, sending authorities out on the course to carry off the injured while the stragglers in the 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton were rerouted away from the smoking site of the blasts.

A federal law-enforcement source confirmed to The Post there are at least 12 dead and 50 injured in the apparent terror attack. Massachusetts General Hospital was treating 10 people with amputated limbs and all operating rooms were on hold earlier today, sources said.

 
TELL US YOUR STORY
» Were you or someone you know at the Boston Marathon this afternoon? Post readers are sharing first-hand accounts of what they saw and heard. Share your story with us using at online@nypost.com.

Law enforcement sources confirmed to The Post that authorities have a identified a suspect, a Saudi national, who is currently being guarded in a Boston hospital with shrapnel wounds.

CBS reported that an individual is in custody. He is reportedly cooperative and denies involvement in the attack.

A White House official told Bloomberg news, "Any event with multiple explosive devices - as this appears to be - is clearly an act of terror."

Homeland Security committee member Rep. Bill Keating (D-MA) called today's explosions a "sophisticated, coordinated event."

The Associated Press reported that there were up to 105 injuries stemming from the explosions and WCVB in Boston is reporting that an 8-year-old boy was among those killed in Monday's attack.

Law-enforcement sources said at least the first explosion occurred in the lobby of a nearby hotel.

AUTHORITIES ID SUSPECT IN MARATHON BOMBINGS

NEW YORK INCREASES SECURITY FOLLOWING MARATHON EXPLOSIONS

PRESIDENT OBAMA'S STATEMENT ON MARATHON EXPLOSIONS

PHOTOS: EXPLOSIONS ROCK BOSTON MARATHON

EXPLOSIONS CAUSE UK TO REVIEW MARATHON SECURITY

"There were two bombs that exploded near the finish line in today's Boston Marathon," The Boston Marathon's official Facebook page read. "We are working with law enforcement to understand what exactly has happened."

According to reports, authorities in Boston found three more explosive devices that had not gone off and police were dismantling them. The two explosions that went off near the Marathon's finish line were detonated remotely, it was reported Monday.

The airspace above the city was ordered cleared as well and was briefly designated a no-fly zone, which has since been lifted, by the FAA following the explosions.

Police confirmed a third explosion at JFK Library in Boston. Boston fire officials previously said that the third explosion was linked to the ones that occurred at the Marathon but later updated their information to say that the explosion was not related. There were no injuries reported from the third bombing.

An unidentified Boston Marathon runner leaves the course crying near Copley Square following an explosion in Boston.

AP

 

"Fire in building is out, appears to have started in the mechanical room of new building," The JFK Library's Twitter account read. "All staff and visitors are accounted for and safe."

A law enforcement official told the Associated Press that officials shut down cellular service throughout the Boston area to prevent remote detonation of explosives. Cellular service has since been restored but due to jamming it is still difficult to communicate with anyone in the Boston area.

Also cops issued an all-points-bulletin for a yellow Penske truck or van that tried to get access to a marathon site, claiming it had medical supplies -- and then sped off or was turned away.

President Obama, was briefed about the incident shortly after the explosions occured.

The Secret Service said they have expanded the security perimeter around the White House out of "an abundance of caution."

Obama called Boston mayor Tom Menino and Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick to express his concern for those that were injured and make clear that his administration is ready to provide needed support as they respond to this incident.

"The American people will say a prayer for Boston tonight and Michelle and I send our deepest thoughts and prayers to the families of the victims in the wake of this senseless loss," Obama said Monday evening.

Gov. Patrick released a statement this afternoon.

“This is a horrific day in Boston. My thoughts and prayers are with those who have been injured. I have been in touch with the President, Mayor Menino and our public safety leaders. Our focus is on making sure that the area around Copley Square is safe and secured. I am asking everyone to stay away from Copley Square and let the first responders do their jobs.”

The after-effects from the explosions reverberated across the nation, including in New York City.

“This changes everything [in New York],’’ one source told The Post. “Everyone’s on high alert. Our marathon was canceled in November. Who knows if that changed someone’s plans?’’

An unidentified Boston Marathon runner leaves the course crying near Copley Square following an explosion in Boston.

AP

 

The NYPD has ramped up its anti-terror efforts at landmarks and other potential terrorist targets “to make sure there’s no nonsense going on here,’’ a law-enforcement source said.

Officers are scouring live feed from surveillance videos throughout the city to monitor possible events, the source said.

NYPD Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne said that the NYPD has deployed its Critical Response Vehicles as well until more about the explosion is learned.

The FDNY says their units have also been advised to use elevated caution due to the explosions.

Mayor Bloomberg released a statement following the explosions.

“As law enforcement authorities investigate today’s explosions in Boston, I ask all New Yorkers to keep the victims and their families in your thoughts and prayers," Bloomberg said. "I have spoken with Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, and the NYPD has stepped up security at strategic locations and critical infrastructure, including our subways."

Governor Cuomo echoed Bloomberg's sentiments and saying that state agencies have all been placed on a heightened state of alert.

Relatives of the victims of December’s school massacre in Newtown, Conn. were among those attending the race finish at a VIP area. It was not known of any of the relatives were among the casualties.

A White House official said President Obama was getting updates on the apparent bombing.

Competitors and race organizers were crying as they fled the chaos. Bloody spectators were being carried to the medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners.

An unidentified Boston Marathon runner leaves the course crying near Copley Square following an explosion in Boston.

AP

 

"There are a lot of people down," said one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter of North Carolina. He was not injured, but marathon workers were carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg. A Boston police officer was wheeled from the course with a leg injury that was bleeding.

About three hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another thunderous explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

Runner Laura McLean of Toronto said she heard two explosions outside the medical tent.

Cherie Falgoust was waiting for her husband, who was running the race.

''I was expecting my husband any minute," she said. "I don't know what this building is ... it just blew. Just a big bomb, a loud boom, and then glass everywhere. Something hit my head. I don't know what it was. I just ducked."

About half of the runners -- virutally all the elite competitors -- had completed the course when the twin explosions went off.

It created a mad rush of bystanders, who frantically dashed away from the scene. Moments later, first responders ran to the wounded, as their blood stained the Boston pavement.

Smoke filled the previously crystal-clear sky and the sounds of sirens rang for blocks.

 

NY Post

Authorities ID suspect as Saudi national in marathon bombings, under guard at Boston hospital

  • Last Updated: 6:35 PM, April 15, 2013
  • Posted: 4:28 PM, April 15, 2013

AP

Police clear the area at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon.

Investigators have a suspect — a Saudi Arabian national — in the horrific Boston Marathon bombings, The Post has learned.

Law enforcement sources said the 20-year-old suspect was under guard at an undisclosed Boston hospital.

Fox News reported that the suspect suffered severe burns.

It was not immediately clear why the man was hospitalized and whether he was injured in the attack or in his apprehension.

The man was caught less than two hours after the 2:50 p.m. bombing on the finish line of the race, in the heart of Boston.

 

12 DEAD, 50 INJURED AFTER 2 EXPLOSIONS ROCK BOSTON MARATHON

NY AUTHORITIES RAMP UP SECURITY AFTER BOSTON EXPLOSIONS

PHOTOS: EXPLOSIONS ROCK BOSTON MARATHON

In addition, Boston police have surveillance video of someone bringing multiple backpacks to the blast site, according to CBS News.

Police also confirmed that there was a third explosion, at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. It was not immediately clear how much damage was done or whether it was related to the bombings at the marathon finish line.

The library bombing occurred about 4:30 p.m. and more than a mile from the marathon.

A law enforcement source confirmed to The Post that 12 people were killed and nearly 50 were injured in today's blast.

 

CBS Boston

2 Dead, At Least 98 Hurt In Explosions At Boston Marathon Finish Line

BOSTON (CBS) – Two people are dead and several dozen injured after two bombs went off near the Boston Marathon finish line Monday afternoon.

It happened around 2:50 p.m. outside Marathon Sports on Boylston Street as thousands of runners were finishing the race.

CBS News senior correspondent John Miller said there is “an individual in custody,” a Saudi national who was near the scene of the blast.

Miller said a civilian claims the person was acting suspiciously and chased him down and tackled him after the explosions.

The man is said to be cooperating with investigators and denies any involvement.

Watch: Live Finish Line Camera

There were two “incredibly powerful explosions just seconds apart,” according to WBZ-TV’s Lisa Hughes, who was at the scene covering the marathon.

Watch: Raw Video of Explosions

 

Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis told reporters at an afternoon news conference there were “simultaneous explosions” that were about “50-to-100 yards apart.”

Watch: Ed Davis News Conference

 

According to CBS News correspondent Bob Orr, two bombs were inside trash cans near the viewing area close to the finish line. Two unexploded devices has been recovered intact, according to CBS News.

Read: Important Information For Families, Victims

Orr is reporting that authorities have recovered surveillance video from the area which shows a man with what looked to be two backpacks near the scene just moments before the blast.

In an interview with WBZ-TV, Rep. Bill Keating said he had been told two more devices were found, but not detonated.  One was said to be at a hotel near Copley Square, the other was at an undisclosed location.

No one has claimed responsibility and there was no advance warning.

Photos:  Boston Marathon Explosions

“There was no information that this was going to happen,” Davis said.

The commissioner said there have been no arrests and that they’re questioning “many people.”

When asked if it was a terrorist attack, Davis said “you can reach your own conclusions on that.”

Federal agencies are “flooding the zone” in Boston right now, according to Orr.

In a brief statement at the White House, President Obama said “Any individual, any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice.”

Watch: President Obama Statement

 

 

“We will find out who did this and we will hold them accountable,” the president said.  He did not take any questions from reporters.

The president has been in contact with Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Boston Mayor Tom Menino.

“The American people will say a prayer for Boston tonight,” Mr. Obama said.

Brigham and Women’s Hospital says it’s treating as many as 26 patients from ages 3 to 62 years old injured in the blast. 22 are at Massachusetts General Hospital, six of them in critical condition.  21 are at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Boston Medical Center is treating 20 patients, including two children, most of whom have received lower leg injuries and Tufts Medical is treating 9 patients.

Some people were missing limbs.  Others had blood on their heads.

“There’s a lot of blood” at the scene, according to WBZ-TV producer Ken Tucci, who reported seeing more than ten people taken away from the area on stretchers.

WATCH: Lisa Hughes On The Phone At The Beginning

 

Patrick released a statement calling it a “horrific day in Boston.”

“My thoughts and prayers are with those who have been injured,” Patrick said.

“I have been in touch with the President, Mayor Menino and our public safety leaders. Our focus is on making sure that the area around Copley Square is safe and secured. I am asking everyone to stay away from Copley Square and let the first responders do their jobs.”

WATCH: WBZ-TV’s Johnathan Elias Reporting

 

Several of the injured were rushed to the marathon medical tent in nearby Copley Square.  Boston Police cleared out the area and the race was ended immediately.

WBZ-TV’s Paul Burton was running the race at the time of the explosions. He said it sounded like cannons in the distance and then all of sudden, police were escorting all the runners off of the course.

Read: Witness Reaction To Explosion

According to WBZ-TV’s Bobby Sisk, those runners were being moved to Boston Common.

WATCH: WBZ-TV Photographer Brian Foley Recounts Explosion

 

A nurse at the finish line medical tent told WBZ-TV several children were hurt and one woman had lost a leg.

WATCH: WBZ-TV Photographer Brian Foley Recounts Explosion

 

Cell phone service has been shut down in the downtown area for fear that another device could be detonated by a phone.

Davis said two hotlines have been set up. One is for families looking for loved ones. That number is 617-635-4500.

The other line is for anyone who may have seen anything before, during or after the explosions.  That number is 1-800-494-TIPS.

Davis warned everyone to stay off the streets downtown, demanding they head home or back to their hotels to be safe. Security has been increased at downtown hotels. He also asked that people not travel in groups.

A 15-block area around the crime scene has been shut down to the public until further notice.

Several runners and spectators left bags behind at the scene and along the course as they fled.

Investigators are now going through all of them, treating each as a possible suspicious device as a precaution.

The FAA said it placed a temporary flight restriction “over an area in Boston at the request of law enforcement,” but the ageny would not offer any specifics.

Davis said there was a third incident at the JFK Library in Dorchester around 4:20 p.m. involving an “incendiary device or a fire,” but that incident does not appear to be related to the first two blasts.

 

AP

Cellphone use heavy, but still operating in Boston

Apr. 15 6:03 PM EDT


Boston Marathon Explosion
 

Medical workers aid an injured man at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. Two bombs exploded near the finish of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing two people, injuring 22 others and sending authorities rushing to aid wounded spectators, race organizers and police said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cellphone companies say service is operating in the Boston area, but with heavy traffic following of the explosions at the Boston Marathon.

A law enforcement official, citing an intelligence briefing, said cellphone service had been shut down Monday in the Boston area to prevent any potential remote detonations of explosives.

But officials with Verizon Wireless and Sprint Nextel said there had been no such requests.

Sprint spokeswoman Crystal Davis said: "Minus some mild call blocking on our Boston network due to increased traffic, our service is operating normally."

Two people were killed and scores injured when two explosives detonated near the finish line of the marathon.

 

Politico

Boston Marathon explosions: FAA shrinks Boston restricted flight area

The FAA has shrunk the radius of its flight restrictions around the area of explosions in Boston to two nautical miles from three nautical miles. The FAA says no pilots may operate amid the radius up to altitudes of 3,000 feet unless they are flying relief aircraft.

(Also on POLITICO: Security tightened after Boston Marathon blasts)

 
 
 

NYPD Increasing Security At Prominent Locations Following Boston Marathon Blasts

Police Commissioner Kelly: 'We Are In The Crosshairs Of Terrorists'

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Security has been beefed up in New York City in the aftermath of twin explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

NYPD Deputy Police Commissioner Paul Browne told WCBS 880′s Rich Lamb that the city is stepping up security at hotels, as well as other prominent locations, through deployment of the NYPD’s critical response vehicles.

Browne added that the additional security will remain until more is learned about the explosions.

“We are in the crosshairs of terrorists and we don’t believe the threat has diminished very much. We don’t know the genesis of this; we don’t know who’s responsible for it, but we sort of have to have a 360-degree perimeter in this city,” NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly told CBS Evening News anchor Scott Pelley on Monday night.

Kelly said because of past attacks and plots against New York, he expects New Yorkers to stay vigilant.

“New Yorkers should be alert. We ask them to be aware of their surrounding and [if they] see anything suspicious, call our resources, call 911, call 311 if it’s not an immediate emergency,” Kelly told Pelley.

On the heightened alert, Kelly said, “This is what we do, we’ve done it in the past and we’re doing it right now.”

Sources told CBS 2′s Marcia Kramer the main focus will be on Manhattan hotels, because that’s where the Boston explosions took place. But there will also be increased security in Times Square, where the city has had a terror alert in the past, and at synagogues, monuments, landmarks like the Empire State Building and all the bridges and tunnels.

There was also expected to be heavier security at Barclays Center, where the Brooklyn Nets were set to take on Washington at 7:30 p.m., CBS 2′s Hazel Sanchez reported.

As WCBS 880′s Peter Haskell reported, more than a half-dozen NYPD cruisers were lined up along Seventh Avenue between 41st and 42nd streets.

Members of the counter-terrorism unit were also seen entering a Communication Division Command Post in Times Square, Haskell reported.

Uniformed officers were to be stationed on every block going north from 42nd Street and Seventh Avenue, Haskell reported.

Boston Police said at least two people were killed and more than 100 were wounded in the explosions.

MORE COVERAGE FROM CBS BOSTON | WATCH LIVE CBS NEWS COVERAGE | LIVE FINISH LINE CAMERA

The explosions went off within seconds of each other about three hours after the winners crossed the finish line, according to officials.

So far, it is unclear what caused the explosions in Boston and no group has claimed responsibility.

Anthony Roman of Long Island-based security consulting firm Roman & Associates told WCBS 880′s Marla Diamond that authorities in large cities are typically on the highest alert level for events like a marathon.

“They remove all of the garbage cans, the mailboxes, they weld the manhole covers shut. They have spotter teams on the roofs, sniper teams. The camera system, as I said, is robust and the software analytics, robust. And there are a tremendous number of officers and concentrated manpower placed at that scene,” Roman said.

NYPD cruisers are lined up in Times Square. Security has been beefed up in the wake of the fatal Boston Marathon explosions. (credit: Peter Haskell/WCBS 880)

NYPD cruisers are lined up in Times Square. Security has been beefed up in the wake of the fatal Boston Marathon explosions. (credit: Peter Haskell/WCBS 880)

According to CBS 2′s Kramer, there is a lot of significance to domestic terrorists exploding bombs this week. Monday is IRS tax deadline day, and Patriots Day in Boston. The anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing and the end of the 50-day Waco siege are on April 19. The anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting, and Adolf Hitler’s birthday are on April 20.

Following the fatal blasts, Mayor Michael Bloomberg released the following statement:

“As law enforcement authorities investigate today’s explosions in Boston, I ask all New Yorkers to keep the victims and their families in your thoughts and prayers. I have spoken with Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, and the NYPD has stepped up security at strategic locations and critical infrastructure, including our subways. Some of the security steps we are taking may be noticeable, including deployment of Critical Response Vehicles and additional police personnel, and others will not be. We have 1,000 members of the NYPD assigned to counter-terrorism duties, and they – along with the entire NYPD and the investments we have made in counter-terrorism infrastructure – are being fully mobilized to protect our city,” Bloomberg said.

NYPD cruiser in Times Square. The NYPD has stepped up security at prominent locations around the city in the wake of the fatal Boston Marathon explosions. (credit: Peter Haskell/WCBS 880)

The NYPD has stepped up security at prominent locations around the city in the wake of the fatal Boston Marathon explosions. (credit: Peter Haskell/WCBS 880)

Bloomberg is among the local officials sending his prayers to those affected by the Boston Marathon blasts.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo also took to Twitter to offer his thoughts and prayers to the city of Boston and the entire state of Massachusetts.

City Councilman Peter Vallone posted his condolences on his Facebook page and noted that there is no credible threat against New York.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority also announced its police department will conduct additional patrols and bag inspections in the wake of the Boston explosions. The MTAPD patrols Metro-North and LIRR trains.

The transit agency released the following statement:

“All security personnel will remind all employees to be vigilant. The increased coverage will continue until we fully understand the cause of the explosions in Boston.  NYPD is also on alert and indicated they will give additional attention to the subway system.”

There is also additional security on NJ TRANSIT because of the situation in Boston.

“As a result of today’s tragic events, NJ TRANSIT is currently in a heightened state of alert,” NJ TRANSIT spokesman John Durso, Jr. told WCBS 880. “There have been no specific threats made against our transit system at this time. However, as a precaution, NJ TRANSIT Police have deployed both uniformed and plain-clothes officers to further patrol our system and keep our customers safe.”

Durso urged passengers to remain alert and report any suspicious activity by calling 1-888-TIPS-NJT (1-888-847-7658).

Please stay with CBSNewYork.com for more on this developing story…


CBS DC


Secret Service Shuts Down Pennsylvania Avenue After Boston Marathon Explosions

WASHINGTON (CBSDC/AP) — Shortly after several explosions occurred at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, Secret Service shut down Pennsylvania Avenue outside the White House, cordoning off the area with yellow police tape.

Several Secret Service patrol cars also blocked off the entry points to the road, and the security perimeter at the White House has been expanded.

Secret Service spokesman Ed Donovan says the measure was taken “out of an abundance of caution.” He says it is not unusual to expand or contract the security perimeters.

The White House says President Barack Obama has been notified about the explosions, and that he has called Boston’s mayor and the Massachusetts governor to express his concern for those injured in the explosions.

Photos: Tragedy at Boston Marathon

The White House says the administration is in contact with state and local authorities and directed his administration to provide whatever assistance is necessary in the investigation and response.

Obama told Mayor Tom Menino and Gov. Deval Patrick that his administration would provide whatever support was needed in responding to the incident, the White House said.

The president was briefed on the explosions by Homeland Security adviser Lisa Monaco shortly after 3 p.m. EDT.

Vice President Joe Biden was on a conference call with gun control activists when staffers turned on televisions in his office Monday to view coverage of the explosions.

RELATED: Hundreds of Boston Marathon Runners From D.C. Area

“Apparently there has been a bombing,” Biden said. “I don’t know any of the details of what caused it, who did it. I don’t think it exists yet. But our prayers are with those people in Boston who suffered injury.”

The White House was not on lockdown and tourists and other onlookers were still able to be in the park across the street from the executive mansion.

Follow WNEW on Twitter.

(TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)


Breitbart

 

Boston blasts prompt UK review of London Marathon

4/15/2013 9:49:17 PM
(AP) Boston blasts prompt UK review of London Marathon
By GREGORY KATZ
Associated Press
LONDON
British police are reviewing security plans for Sunday's London Marathon, the next major international marathon, because of the bombs that killed two people at the race in Boston. But there is no known specific or credible threat against the hugely popular British race at the moment, a security official said.

Police already were preparing a major security operation for Wednesday's ceremonial funeral for former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, an event at St. Paul's Cathedral that will be attended by Queen Elizabeth II and many dignitaries. The plans call for a procession through the streets of London, with Thatcher's flag-draped coffin to be carried on a horse-drawn carriage.

The funeral's security plans are expected to be reviewed in light of the Boston bombings.

London has long been considered a top target for international terrorists, with the government saying the threat level is "substantial." In 2005, a series of suicide attacks on the public transport system in the British capital killed 52 people. London and mainland Britain also face a moderate threat from Northern Ireland-related terrorism, according to the government.

Two bombs exploded near the finish of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing two people, and injuring at least 22 others, race organizers and police said. The situation sparked alarm bells in Britain, where a massive security operation was put in place last summer to protect the successful London Olympics.

Last year, some 37,500 athletes competed in the London Marathon, with many more watching the springtime event.

Chief Superintendent Julia Pendry, police commander for the London race, said Monday that "a security plan is in place for the London Marathon. We will be reviewing security arrangements in partnership with (the) London Marathon."

A police spokesman who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to go on the record said the security presence may be increased.

A security official, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the matter, said there are no credible or specific threats against the London Marathon.

The London race's chief executive, Nick Bitel, said marathon officials contacted the police to discuss security plans "as soon as we heard the news" about Boston. He expressed shock and sadness about the situation in Boston, saying "it is a very sad day for athletics and for our friends in marathon running."

___

AP Writers Paisley Dodds and Cassandra Vinograd contributed to this report.
 
 
 
Apr 15, 2013 3:27pm

7:22 pm ET:  An 8-year-old child is among those killed in the Boston bombings, a law enforcement source confirmed to ABC News.

6:41 pm ET: ABC News has revised its estimate of the number of people  injured in the Boston Marathon bombing incident  to at least 99 people.

6:29 pm ET: Boston hospitals report “multiple amputations” among those injured at Boston Marathon.

6:13 pm ET: “We will find out who did this and we will hold them accountable,” says President Obama.

6:12 pm ET:  We do not know who did this or why… But make no mistake. We will get to the bottom of this,” says President Obama.

6:11 pm ET: “On days like this there are no Republicans and Democrats,” says President Obama.

6:10 pm ET: President Obama is now addressing the nation.

ht obama white house nt 130415 wblog LIVE UPDATES: Boston Marathon Explosion

President Barack Obama talks on the phone with FBI Director Robert Mueller to receive an update on the explosions that occurred in Boston

6:04 pm ET: Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D- Calif., chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, tells ABC News: ”It is a terrorist incident. …  It could be foreign, it could be homegrown.”  She said the attack had the “hallmarks” of a terror attack.

 

6:02 pm ET: ATF agents have descended on Brigham and Women’s hospital where they’re questioning one potential person of interest.

5:56 pm ET: At least 86 people have been taken to area hospitals, according to a tally by ABC News.

5:48 pm ET: FAA lifts restrictions on air travel over Boston. Logan Airport has been reopened.

5:41 pm ET: President Obama expected to address the nation at 6:10 p.m.

5:37 pm ET: Boston police now say library incident was likely an unrelated fire.

READ: Boston Marathon Explosion Witnesses: Smoke, Trampling, ‘Like a War Zone’

5:28 pm ET: Red Cross says it does not need any more blood donations. “There is currently enough blood on the shelves.”

gty victim boston tk 130415 wblog LIVE UPDATES: Boston Marathon Explosion

5:22 pm ET: Federal law enforcement officials are treating incident as a “terrorist attack.”

Google sets up Boston Marathon person finder website.

4:58 pm ET: No one has taken responsibility for the attack, says Police Commissioner Ed Davis.

4:55 pm ET: There was also a controlled explosion on Boylston St., not one of the three incidents, says Commissioner Ed Davis.

4:53 pm ET: Police ask anyone with knowledge of attacks to call 1-800-494-TIPS

CLICK HERE FOR PHOTOS FROM THE SCENE

4:51 pm ET: Determined there was a third incident at JFK Library around 4:20 p.m. Not certain if incidents are related, but treating them as if they are, says Davis. There are no known injuries from that event.

4:50 pm ET: Two explosions, 50 to 100 yards apart at the finish line at 2:50 p.m. “All victims have been removed from scene,” Boston Police Commissioner  Ed Davis said at a news conference.

ap strong crowd kb 130415 wblog LIVE UPDATES: Boston Marathon Explosion

4:49 pm ET: New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg says security increased throughout that city.

4:48 pm ET: Massachusetts authorities confirm at least 68 patients transported to area hospitals.

4:41 pm ET: Boston Police are asking the public to turn over any video of the finish line explosion.

ap boston injured kb 130415 wblog LIVE UPDATES: Boston Marathon Explosion

4:38 pm ET:  “There is no sign of any radiological material involved in the explosion,” a federal source tells ABC News.

4:35 pm ET:  Two more explosive devices have been found near the scene of the explosion, according to the Associated Press.

 4:34 pm ET: Some 400 Massachusetts National Guard soldiers were on the scene for the marathon.

4:24 pm ET: A Federal law enforcement source confirms to ABC News this was an intentional bombing, using small portable explosive devices.

gty marathon explosion police tk 130415 wblog LIVE UPDATES: Boston Marathon Explosion

4:21 pm ET: Boston police confirm they have found three more suspicious devices. One has been rendered safe.

 4:13 pm ET:  The FAA has issued a temporary flight restriction over the area of the explosion.

4:11 pm ET: Boston Fire Department to brief media at 4:30 p.m.  at Westin Hotel.

4:09 pm ET: Tufts Medical Center confirms that 9 victims have been taken there.

4:06 pm ET: Law enforcement authorities tell ABC News they are testing smoke and materials at the scene for chemical substances.

4:05 pm ET: Boston police confirm at least 22 injured, 2 dead.


4:03 pm ET: Police to search hundreds of bags left at scene by marathon participants.

4:02 pm ET:  “The president has been notified of the incident in Boston,” a White House official tells ABC News. “His administration is in contact with state and local authorities.  He directed his administration to provide whatever assistance is necessary in the investigation and response.”

3:55 pm ET: Police set off controlled explosion in Boston. Third explosion heard.

3:54 pm ET: Marathon’s website tracking runners who completed the race, here

CLICK HERE FOR PHOTOS FROM THE SCENE

ht twitter runners stopped kb 130415 wblog LIVE UPDATES: Boston Marathon Explosion

3:43 pm ET:  Trauma nurse tells ABC News that the race’s medical tent has become a makeshift morgue. Dealing with injuries including severed limbs and children with severe burns.

3:41 pm ET: Eyewitness Hayden Cary describes a “hectic, crazy scene.” Heard explosion go off within seconds of each other near a car, steps from finish line.

ap boston marathon scene kb 130415 wblog LIVE UPDATES: Boston Marathon Explosion

CLICK HERE  FOR LIVE STREAMING COVERAGE AT THE SCENE

3:34 pm ET: Police bomb squads sweep area looking for suspicious packages.

3:29 pm ET: Massachusetts General Hospital confirms at least 4 injured taken there.

CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE COVERAGE

3:25 pm  ET:  Police warning people in area to avoid trash cans.

boston marathon 2013 map 130415 wblog LIVE UPDATES: Boston Marathon Explosion

3:15 pm ET:  Boston Police Department says two explosions on Boyleston street near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.  Police,  fire and bomb squad responding. The number of injuries is unknown. The cause is unknown.

The two explosions took place around 2:56 pm,  within second of each other. The first runners in the marathon crossed the finish line around noon.

abc boston marathon initial kb 130415 wblog LIVE UPDATES: Boston Marathon Explosion

 

NY Times: Possibly 5 Devices

Blasts at Boston Marathon Kill 2

  • John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe
  • Elise Amendola/Associated Press
  • Kenshin Okubo/The Daily Free Press, via Associated Press
  • Charles Krupa/Associated Press
  • John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe, via Associated Press
  • David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe, via Associated Press
  • Winslow Townson/Associated Press
  • Alex Trautwig/Getty Images
  • NBC, via Reuters
  • Charles Krupa/Associated Press
  • Evan McGlinn for The New York Times
  • Charles Krupa/Associated Press
  • WBZ-TV, via Associated Press
  • Charles Krupa/Associated Press
  • Alex Trautwig/Getty Images
  • Dominick Reuter/Reuters
A woman was tended to at the scene of the first explosion.




BOSTON — Two bombs exploded near the finish line at the Boston Marathon on Monday, leaving two people dead and dozens more wounded.

A third explosion was heard just before 4 p.m., about an hour after the first two blasts, at the nearby John F. Kennedy Library. The police later said that episode may have been unrelated.

The two explosions, which occurred seconds apart, created a chaotic scene, as wounded runners and bloodied spectators were helped to a nearby tent that was being used for weary runners, The Associated Press reported. Some were crying and several said they saw limbs on the ground.

Many blocks around the race’s finish line were cordoned off while the police began an investigation.

Police officials said they did not yet have any suspects in custody. A person briefed on preliminary developments in the investigation said that members of Boston’s Joint Terrorist Task Force were at Brigham and Women’s Hospital interviewing a wounded man seen running from the scene of the two blasts, near 671 Boylston Street. The person said that police investigators had contacted the local gas and electric company and determined that the explosions were not related to gas or electrical service.

The authorities also found a device at St. James and Trinity Streets that did not explode, the person said, and two other devices were found, including one in Newton, outside of Boston.

The Mandarin, Marriott and Lenox hotels were evacuated because of reports of suspicious packages, but no confirmed explosive devices have yet been found at those hotels.

The person also said that the maritime security level in Boston was raised from level one to level two; three is the highest level.

“We’re treating this as an ongoing event at this time,” Edward F. Davis, Boston’s police commissioner, said at a late afternoon news conference.

He said he was unsure whether the first two explosions were related, but that his department was treating them as such. He added that the police had no advance warning of the explosions.

The commissioner declined to call the blasts a terrorist attack, but said, “you can reach your own conclusions about what happened here.”

At the White House, President Obama said that those responsible would “feel the full weight of justice.”

Several news outlets reported that a loud explosion was heard on the north side of Boylston Street, near a photo bridge that marks the finish line, at about 3 p.m. Another explosion was heard shortly afterward. The first two blasts occurred about 50 to 100 yards apart, Mr. Davis said, about four hours after the start of the men’s race, which meant that there were still several thousand runners yet to finish the course.

Mr. Davis added that a “controlled explosion” also took place on Boylston Street.

People were also cleared from an area around the Copley Plaza Hotel after a package was found on a footbridge nearby.

More than 23,000 runners started the race and 17,600 had already crossed the finish line. Nearly 4,500 other runners did not finish and were presumably diverted from the course.

Will Ritter, the press secretary for Gabriel Gomez, a Republican candidate for Senate, was trying to arrange a party for Mr. Gomez, who was running the marathon. He said the explosions sounded like the end of a fireworks display, “the concussions you send off, it sounded like that.”

People started screaming, “Bomb! Run!” People ran east while the police ran west, Mr. Ritter said, adding that he saw injured people being wheeled away. Many runners never made it to the finish line. “These people are at the edge of their physical ability, wandering around sweaty and wondering where to go.”

Authorities in large cities are typically on the highest level of alert for events like a marathon, said Anthony Roman, a security expert.

“It is quite the counterterrorism effort,” said Mr. Roman, who runs Roman & Associates, a New York firm.

For major events in New York and other large cities, Mr. Roman said the police would typically weld manhole covers shut, while also examining the entire route just before the race. They would also place snipers on rooftops, with helicopters overhead. Analytic cameras in the city would also be used, he said.

“They have all the analytic cameras in the city focusing on the race with their advanced software network, reading license plates,” Mr. Roman said.

The Boston Marathon, established in 1897 and one of the six World Marathon Majors, is one of running’s most storied events. It typically attracts an estimated 500,000 spectators and requires certain qualifying times for most runners to compete.

David Monti, editor and publisher of Race Results Weekly, was already back at his hotel when the explosions went off. But he said because the Boston Marathon has a staggered start, “finisher density was high” when the bombs exploded. “Most race organizers have security plans in place, but let’s face it, marathons are no different than other street celebrations like parades.”

Based on last year’s finish, more than half of the runners — or about 11,000 people — would have crossed the finish line within 30 minutes of the first two explosions.

The course winds through several outlying cities, including Ashland, Framingham, Natick, Wellesley and Newton, before it ends in downtown Boston.

Unlike many sporting events that take place in closed arenas, marathons are known and heralded for their sprawl, allowing throngs of spectators to line the 26.2-mile course.

Within minutes of the explosions on Monday, social media and cable networks projected the images of gray smoke on Boylston Street, with emergency crews on the scene.

After the explosions, a spokesman for the New York Police Department said security was being increased at hotels and other prominent locations in New York. The New York Police Department and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives sent officials to Boston as well.

Flights in and out of Boston were grounded and the airspace over Washington, D.C. was closed.

Reporting was contributed by Steve Eder, Ashley Parker, William K. Rashbaum, Katharine Q. Seelye and Mary Pilon from New York, Eric Schmitt and Michael S. Schmidt from Washington, and Josh Elliott and Tim Rohan from Boston.

 
 
 
Apr 15, 7:03 PM EDT

Boston Marathon bombing kills 2, injures over 100


 

BOSTON (AP) -- Two bombs exploded in the packed streets near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing two people and injuring more than 100 in a terrifying scene of shattered glass, bloodstained pavement and severed limbs, authorities said.

A senior U.S. intelligence official said two other bombs were found near the end of the 26.2-mile course.

President Barack Obama vowed that those responsible will "feel the full weight of justice."

A White House official speaking on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still unfolding said the attack was being treated as an act of terrorism.

Authorities shed no light on a motive or who may have carried out the attack, and police said they had no suspects in custody. Authorities in Washington said there was no immediate claim of responsibility.

"They just started bringing people in with no limbs," said runner Tim Davey, of Richmond, Va. He said he and his wife, Lisa, tried to keep their children's eyes shielded from the gruesome scene inside a medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners, but "they saw a lot."

"They just kept filling up with more and more casualties," Lisa Davey said. "Most everybody was conscious. They were very dazed."

The fiery twin blasts took place almost simultaneously and about 100 yards apart, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet, shattering windows and sending dense plumes of smoke rising over the street and through the fluttering national flags lining the course.

When the second bomb went off, the spectators' cheers turned to screams. As sirens blared, emergency workers and National Guardsmen assigned to the race for crowd control began climbing over and tearing down temporary fences to get to the blast site.

A pool of blood formed, and huge shards were missing from window panes as high as three stories.

Boston police said two people were killed. Hospitals reported at least 105 injured, at least 15 of them critically.

Some 23,000 runners took part in the race, one of the world's oldest and most prestigious marathons. One of Boston's biggest annual events, the race winds up near Copley Square, not far from the landmark Prudential Center and the Boston Public Library. It is held on Patriots Day, which commemorates the first battles of the American Revolution, at Concord and Lexington in 1775.

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis asked people to stay indoors or go back to their hotel rooms and avoid crowds as bomb squads methodically checked parcels and bags left along the race route. He said investigators didn't know precisely where the bombs were planted or whether they were hidden in mailboxes or trash cans.

He said authorities had received "no specific intelligence that anything was going to happen" at the race.

The Federal Aviation Administration barred low-flying aircraft from within 3.5 miles of the site.

Obama was briefed on the explosions by Homeland Security adviser Lisa Monaco. Obama also told Mayor Tom Menino and Gov. Deval Patrick that his administration would provide whatever support was needed, the White House said.

"We still don't know who did this or why," Obama said, adding, "Make no mistake: We will get to the bottom of this."

A few miles away from the finish line and around the same time, a fire broke out at the John F. Kennedy Library. The police commissioner said it may have been caused by an incendiary device but didn't appear to be related to the bombings.

The first loud explosion occurred on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. The second explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

They occurred about four hours into the race and two hours after the men's winner crossed the line. By that point, more than 17,000 of the runners had finished the race, but thousands of others were farther back along the course.

The four-hour mark is typically a highly crowded time near the finish line - both because of the slow-but-steady recreational runners likely to be completing the race and because of all the relatives and friends clustered around to cheer them on.

Runners in the medical tent for treatment of dehydration or other race-related ills were pushed out to make room for victims of the bombing.

A senior U.S. intelligence official said the two other explosive devices found nearby were being dismantled. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the findings publicly.

A woman who was a few feet from the second bomb, Brighid Wall, 35, of Duxbury, said that when it exploded, runners and spectators froze, unsure of what to do. Her husband threw their children to the ground, lay on top of them and another man lay on top of them and said, "Don't get up, don't get up."

After a minute or so without another explosion, Wall said, she and her family headed to a Starbucks and out the back door through an alley. Around them, the windows off the bars and restaurants were blown out.

She said she saw six to eight people bleeding profusely, including one man who was kneeling, dazed, with blood coming down his head. Another person was on the ground covered in blood and not moving.

"My ears are zinging. Their ears are zinging," Wall said. "It was so forceful. It knocked us to the ground."

Competitors and race volunteers were crying as they fled the chaos. Authorities went onto the course to carry away the injured while race stragglers were rerouted away from the smoking site.

Roupen Bastajian, a 35-year-old state trooper from Smithfield, R.I., had just finished the race when they put the heat blanket wrap on him and he heard the blasts.

"I started running toward the blast. And there were people all over the floor," he said. "We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated. ... At least 25 to 30 people have at least one leg missing, or an ankle missing, or two legs missing."

At Massachusetts General Hospital, said Alisdair Conn, chief of emergency services, said: "This is something I've never seen in my 25 years here ... this amount of carnage in the civilian population. This is what we expect from war."

The Boston Marathon honored the victims of the Newtown, Conn., shooting with a special mile marker in Monday's race.

Boston Athletic Association president Joanne Flaminio previously said there was "special significance" to the fact that the race is 26.2 miles long and 26 people died at Sandy Hook Elementary school.

---

Associated Press writers Jay Lindsay, Steve LeBlanc, Bridget Murphy and Meghan Barr in Boston; Julie Pace, Lara Jakes and Eileen Sullivan in Washington; and Marilynn Marchione in Milwaukee contributed to this report.

 

The Big Story

Jordan extremist praises Boston bombing

Apr. 15 6:40 PM EDT

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